1. 15:41 13th Apr 2010

    Notes: 1

    Interesting follow up on Claire’s presentation including another interview. It is amazing how LCD and high-resolution screens have been manipulated and devleoped to create cameras that in fact, have no lens at all… In this case, it is an LCD screen that records position and orientation relative to the actors. Only about 25% of Avatar was filmed using traditional performances on set. This article does a great job going into Cameron’s ideology and chronicles how this techonology was developed.

     
  2. 15:33

    Notes: 1

     
  3. 15:27

    Notes: 3

    Found an article mentioning the pixel roller which included another video gallery so you can see current works in progress. This is a really interesting technology because I feel it can really change how we learn about and create art in a school-setting. The more digital and efficient making art becomes, I feel the more accessible it will be to everyone and hopefully art programs will be better integrated into all schools….

     
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  5. 09:03

    Notes: 4

    Reblogged from christinapfaff

    A new study reveals that the better a woman does in school, the more likely it is she will grow up and abuse alcohol.
     
  6. 23:03 6th Apr 2010

    Notes: 3

    Experimenting with Color

     
  7. 22:54

    Notes: 3

    experimenting

     
  8. 22:49 5th Apr 2010

    Notes: 1

    music

    Really into ellie goulding lately and sia…. so good and very different than what’s circulating the radio everyday. also really excited for chiddy bang to come to campus in a few weeks!! much better than having afroman perform at school lol

     
  9. 00:02 25th Mar 2010

    Notes: 34

    Reblogged from simko

    Plays: 550

    simko:

    Charlotte Gainsbourg (lyrics by Beck) - Greenwich Mean Time… Every season, I fall madly in love with a song that is played at the shows during Fashion Week. This season was no exception. Last.

     
  10. 23:15 23rd Mar 2010

    Notes: 1

    The Future of e-Books

    While there were many interesting ideas in Nick Bilton’s presentation, the comment on how the brain interacts with e-Books seemed most intriguing. Not only am I an avid reader but I have often been interested in neuroscience, though never quite sure what some of it meant! The effects of e-Books on the brain don’t seem to be harsh, in fact encouraging reading in any form is good for the brain. The ventral pathway is often used in the reading of routine and familiar passages. The pathway processes letters and words and allows us to read quickly. Most readers use this passage way to read, however, when reading unfamiliar text scientists have found that another pathway is used to form words. This is known as the dorsal route, which we use to sound out syllables and put together words. Previously, scientists thought we only used this pathway when we were first learning to read, however, studies prove adults use it for hard to read fonts, languages, or unfamiliar words.

    These studies have been conducted through the use of fMRI machines, which interestingly enough are often used in marketing research. As a marketing student, I frequently read and study on how eye-tracking devices and fMRI’s are used to conduct research on how consumers read advertisements or labels on products etc. It will be interesting to see certain devices, like eye-tracking, into e-Books to track reader’s: what they look at, for how long, and what attracts them most.

    While scientific studies like this seem innovative and helpful to business and technology industries, there is an uncomfortable feeling that such invasion produces. What happened to the hard-bound editions of our favorite books and that smell of printed pages?

    After reading Jonah Lehrer’s article on reading e-Books and the blogger comments that ensued,  I began thinking about my childhood and how reading was such an active part of growing up. I collected books and used to spend hours in the library picking out new ones to read each week. The next generation will probably never pick up a printed book with as much excitement as I once did. Why bother when they can read the same books online, surf the Internet, chat with their friends, play video games, and watch movies all on one device?

    While I hope it doesn’t come down to this, it is worrisome to think that kids will be sitting in front of a screen, most likely squinting, at books with video links to distract them! Despite this, there are always two sides to a coin. While I may have flashbacks to my weekly visits to the library, I also understand that e-Books provide a lot of benefits for readers also. People can select font and font size and adjust the settings to what is most comfortable to them. And I suppose, e-Books also eliminate papercuts which can be quite a hazard :)